Exhibition Checklist  
   
Andrew Binder
No Date
 
#38
Binder, Andrew [Artist and paper engineer]
[Untitled: heart-shaped book] [Ft. Lauderdale, FL : The artist, n.d]
[6] p.: [4] double page col. pop-ups; 8.5 x 6.5 x 1.5 cm. [closed]; 8.5 x 6.5 x 7 cm [open]
[Safety pin on p. [1] of cover to be used to fasten book to one’s sleeve. – Metal image of man with a lance riding a horse affixed with string on bottom of p. [1] of cover. – Media: B/W photography with copper toning, and collage, sterling silver etched plate]
1992

Untitled: heart-shaped book.

#39
Binder, Andrew [Artist and paper engineer]
Rules for the starving artist.
[Ft. Lauderdale, FL: The artist, ©1992]
[34] p.: [15 col. pop-ups]; 28 x 22 x 7.5 cm.
[“To be an artist sometimes has its difficulties: there are no rule books, no road maps, and the apprentice system has passed into memory. It is very easy to fall into misdirection and become adrift (in the ocean of night) inside your head and in your life. It is for this reason that I created my personal rules for the starving artist, in the hopes that if I follow them, one day I will no longer be starving.” – p. [5] – CONTENTS: #1, You must work and create. Corollary: (Work! Work! Work!); #2, Believe in yourself! (Nobody else can do it for you.); #3, Never refuse free food!; #4, Look, listen, and be open to input and experience; #5, Believe that you are immortal (because you probably don’t have health insurance); #6, Ideas have integrity so must you; #7, You have something unique to give and create. (See Rule #2.); #8 Preserve and protect your work; #9, Never be afraid of exposing yourself or what you believe in within your art. (If it is not important to you, it will not be important to anyone.); #10, Beware! People will try to use you and your art; #11, Think of free materials as an opportunity to create and use them. (Even if you have to pick them off the road side.); #12, Break/burn the shit!; #13, You must show your work for the message to be received; #14, If you try to submerge the artist within yourself, you will become sick. – Media: B/W photocopy and color photocopy and hand painting]
Lent by the artist
1993
Rules for the starving artist.
#40
Binder, Andrew [Artist and paper engineer]
Rules for the starving artist, part two: (the deep.).
[Ft. Lauderdale, FL: The artist, ©1993]
[34] p.: [14 col. pop-ups]; 28 x 22 x 6.5 cm.
[“To be an artist sometimes has its difficulties: there are no rule books, no road maps, and the apprentice system has passed into memory. It is very easy to fall into misdirection and be¬come adrift (in the ocean of night) inside your head and in your life. It is for this reason that I created my personal rules for the starving artist, in the hopes that if I follow them, one day I will no longer be starving. In a sense I am equating the lack of direction in life as being lost in the unconscious mind from a Jungian point of view, and I am using the metaphor of the ocean to represent this concept. In this vein, I have used maps as a base for the collage elements in this series of books, each book utilizing a different aspect of cartography. The backgrounds for this book are derived from sea navigation and depth charts”. – “This book is dedicated to Kim Fields, Angel DiCosola, and Susan M. Urbanek.” – p. [5]. – CONTENTS: #15, It doesn’t do anybody any good if it remains in your head. Just having the idea is not enough; a work of art must be created and communicated in some fashion; #16, Always be prepared to create art and receive inspiration. Keep a means of creation (a sketch book, a camera, or etc.) with you at all times; #17, Turn you bad habits into art; #18, All art shows judges are idiots. Remember this rule when you are judging a show and be humble; #19, Finish more works than you start; #20 You must do the best work that you are capable of doing; #21, Make the next piece of art better than the last; #22, Be innovative in terms of subject matter; anybody can draw flowers, sailboats, etc.; #23, Don’t be afraid of change . . . If your art all looks the same; it might all be bad. Corollary: Try new things; #24, Draw well; it is the key to your life; #25 Have complex ideas behind your ascetics. (Leave simplistic ideas for simpletons.); #26, Leave part of the idea unrevealed; so the viewer must bring something to the experience; #27, Be adaptable. Dinosaurs are extinct; #28, At the end of the day ask yourself the question: What have you done today to fulfill your dreams and your art?]
Lent by the artist
1995

Rules for the starving artist, part two: (the deep.).

Rules for the starving artist, part two: (the deep.).

#41
Binder, Andrew [Artist and paper engineer]
Rules for the starving artist, (part three): the ocean of the sky.
[Ft. Lauderdale, FL: The artist, ©1995]
[34] p.: [14 col. pop-ups]; 28 x 22 x 7.5 cm.
[“To be an artist sometimes has its difficulties: there are no rule books, no road maps, and the apprentice system has passed into memory. It is very easy to fall into misdirection and become adrift (in the ocean of night) inside your head and in your life. It is for this reason that I created my personal rules for the starving artist, in the hopes that if I follow them, one day I will no longer be starving. In a sense I am equating the lack of direction in life as being lost in the unconscious mind from a Jungian point of view, and I am using the metaphor of the ocean to represent this concept. In this vein, I have used maps as a base for the collage elements in this series of books, each book utilizing a different aspect of cartography. The backgrounds for this book are derived from aviation and meteorology maps, hence; its sub title: the ocean of the sky.” — p. [4] – CONTENTS: #29, Use permanent materials for art works that are meant to be permanent. Even the Met. can’t fix a Pollack painted with bad house paint; #30, You must walk before you can dance, but don’t ever be afraid to try; #31, Always remember, you can’t be hurt by someone emotionally unless you respect them; #32, Beware of lying to yourself; #33, Find good custodians for your children. (see rule #10.* protecting your work is as important as the money.); #34, The final judge of your work is you, but always remember rule #32; #35, never throw away a good idea; just because the art that you created to express it is bad. Put it aside . . . You are just not ready to make the real work yet; #36, Beware of becoming an art dilettante. (Someone who keeps the outward trappings of an artist, but does little or no work.); #37, There are no short cuts. Although, money can be very helpful; #38, Do what you must to keep creating art; #39, Don’t be wishy washy. Create a style or form a view point and be true to it, but always remember rule #23*; #40, Everything that you wish to make will always take longer than you thought it possibly could; so plan accordingly; #41, Always remember, you are normal; everyone else is just a little strange . . . Accountants don’t make good artists anyway, so why try to act like one? – p. [2] – “This book is dedicated to Edward Ghannam and J. Tomas Lopez.” – p. [5]
Lent by the artist
1996

Rules for the starving artist, (part three): the ocean of the sky.

Rules for the starving artist, (part three): the ocean of the sky.

#42
Binder, Andrew [Artist and paper engineer]
Metamorphoses Octet: the heart of the immortal.
[Ft. Lauderdale, FL: The artist, ©1996]
[16] p.: [[8] double-page col. pop-ups + box; 42.5 x 30.5 x 5 cm. [book]; 46 x 33 x 6 cm. [box]
[Title from cover of box. – Signed “Andrew Bin¬der” on cover of box. – Box and book in the shape of a heart. – The book is designed to read from front to back. – CONTENTS: #[1], The Keeper of Systems; #[2], To Hide in Center; #[3], The Lady’s Tree; #[4], Home of the Heart; #[5], The Thinker’s Page; #[6], The Classic Conflict; #[7] The Whirlwind; #[8], The Fish of Fools. – “Each collaged page is intricately engineered and lushly illustrated with drawings of men and women, various flora, hearts marked with Russian text, hands, rib cage, insects, a 3D spiral, sea creatures, and a fish.” – Description provided by the Sackners. – Media: Etching, silkscreen, inkjet print, photocopy, gum print, with collage and hand drawing / painting]
Lent by Ruth and Marvin Sackner

Metamorphoses Octet: the heart of the immortal.

#43
Binder, Andrew [Artist and paper engineer]
Metamorphoses Octet: the Madonna of the Machine.
[by] Andrew Binder.
[Ft. Lauderdale, FL: The artist, 1996]
[18] p.: [8] double page col. pop-ups; 75 x 64 x 4.5 cm. [closed]; 75 x 64 x 59 cm. [open]
[Title from label on p. [8]. – “This book is for Ro¬ger Zelazny. Better late than never. I would also like to thank my models: they know who they are . . .” – Recto of title label on p. [8]. – Media: B/W Photogra¬phy, color photography, rubber stamp, drawing, inkjet print, photocopy, with collage and painting]
Lent by the artist
Metamorphoses Octet: the Madonna of the Machine.
#44
Binder, Andrew [Artist and paper engineer]
Rules for the starving artist, (part four): The ocean of the underground, or, The ocean of stone.
[Ft. Lauderdale, FL: The artist, ©1996]
[42] p.: [18 col. pop-ups]; 28 x 22 x 9.5 cm.
[“To be an artist sometimes has its difficulties: there are no rule books, no road maps, and the apprentice system has passed into memory. It is very easy to fall into misdirection and become adrift (in the ocean of night) inside your head and in your life. It is for this reason that I created my personal rules for the starving artist, in the hopes that if I follow them, one day I will no longer be starving. In a sense I am equating the lack of direction in life as being lost in the unconscious mind from a Jungian point of view, and I am using the metaphor of the ocean to represent this concept. In this vein, I have used maps as a base for the collage elements in this series of books, each book utilizing a different aspect of cartography. The backgrounds for this book were derived from geology, and mineralogical survey maps. Hence, its sub titles: The Ocean of Stone, or the Ocean of The Underground.” – p. [6-7]. – “This book is for Kim Fields”. – p. [4] – “I would like to thank Tom Lopez for rule 44”. – p. [4] – CONTENTS: #42, Only fight one dragon at a time, in terms of technique, idea, composition, etc. You can only afford one lost cause at a time, so keep your focus; #43, Do your best to think interesting thoughts; #44, Always remember: the life of an artist is a hard life. (At least for those of us that are starving.) So do any other job that you can, and only be an artist if you must; #45, Give yourself time to think your interesting thoughts . . . My favorite stratagem is to get someone to pay me for the time, and do my thinking while I am engaged in some mindless activity. (Ditch digging, clerking, and teaching are good examples of such jobs which have this peculiar fringe benefit.); #46, Always remember that you work in one of the most hazardous professions of all. So wear protective gear (as long as it doesn’t interfere with the work at hand.); #47, Do not condone censorship, lest it be enacted on you; #48, Remember: you are a success if your work can positively influence at least one other person; #49, You can only afford one addiction at a time, the muse is a demeaning mistress, so consume in moderation; #50, Envy is like the cricket in the soup of life, avoid it: Don’t place it there, nor eat it; #51, Take responsibility for the messages in your art. For they can both create and destroy; #52, Do you best to break the status quo and go against the grain; #53, Analyze after the moment, create now!; #54, Always remember: revenge is sweeter when painted in pictures; #55, There are two sides to every coin. Good art does not always have to be dark and angst ridden, it can be happy and funny as well. Shitting razor blades is only painful to the artist, and not necessarily good art; #56 Forethought, creation, and analysis: it is a useful paradigm in art and life. This might seem inconsistent in terms of some of the other rules; yet, it is also true; #57, Take a chance . . . This idea should epitomize your approach and your life. Success in the arts is a crap shoot, just make sure that you do good work, that is the only thing that you can control with certainty.]
Lent by the artist
1997
Rules for the starving artist, (part four): The ocean of the underground, or, The ocean of stone.
#45
Binder, Andrew [Artist and paper engineer]
Metamorphoses Octet: the center of this immortal.
[Ft. Lauderdale, FL: The artist, ©1997]
18 p.: [12 col. pop-ups]; 22.5 x 17.5 x 4.5 cm.
[Media: Hand made paper, with etching, inkjet prints, collage, and hand painting. (Placed in a shaped portfolio box.)]
Lent by the artist

Metamorphoses Octet: the center of this immortal.

#46
Binder, Andrew [Artist and paper engineer]
Martin, Autum [Artist]
Martin, Jazmin [Artist]
Zoophonia.
[Ft. Lauderdale, FL: The Artist, ©1997]
[26] p.: [11 col. pop-ups]; 29 x 22 x 5 cm.
[“This book is dedicated to Leesa Martin on her birthday, 2/10/97” – p. [2] – “There came a day that I needed to get away, and a trip to the zoo seemed the thing to do . . . But all these animals just kept getting in the way . . . Here were Autumn, Jazmin, and I trying to climb into my car to see a zoo to find. . . .” – p. [5]. – Media: ink jet prints, with hand coloring]
Lent by the artist
2000
Zoophonia.
#47
Binder, Andrew [Artist and paper engineer]
Needs vs. reality vs. life . . .
[Ft. Lauderdale, FL: The artist, ©2000]
[16] p.: [7 col. pop-ups]; 18 x 35.5 x 2.5 cm.
[In box. – “The subject of this book is the dichotomy I sense that exists between wants and social/spiritual (or sexual) needs as distorted by environment, time, or personality. In fact, once you start thinking about them the conflicts seem to propagate. A shaping of viewpoint happens, when each facet is looked at separately, but as a whole our figures are subtly shaped as if by an Ocular Distortion, or a bending of light by massive gravity. A black hole in life or its reverse. In any event the message is in the media and life distorts time.” – p. [7]. – “I created this book with a combination of techniques and tools. Using an amber light and a red filter I was able to construct the pop up sections under light safe conditions. I then projected negatives of figures in space, after subsequent development and fixing the pop up sections were reapplied. This technique was meant to reflect the subject of a distortion of reality as seen from the perspective of wants and needs. The colored sections were created using a variety of software, mostly Adobe Photoshop 5 and Adobe Illustrator 8, and output on a Epson 1520 large format printer.” – Signed by the artist. – Colophon]
Lent by the artist
2001
Needs vs. reality vs. life . . .
#48
Binder, Andrew [Artist and paper engineer]
The abandoned muse.
[Ft. Lauderdale, FL: The artist, ©2001]
[18] p.: [7] col. pop-ups; 42.5 x 26 x 4.5 cm.
[In box; with cover title & colophon signed by the artist; book reads from back to front. – “I am an artist with an appreciation of the figurative tradition. This appreciation however brings with it some baggage, some of this baggage is historical and some of it is personal. Anybody who has read the revised history of art from the Feminist perspective understands what I am speaking about in terms of art history where many figurative artists in the past (especially in the Modernist era) applied their aesthetic experiments to women’s bodies. In other words, male artists used women as objects rather than participants and partners. While I do create art with representation of both sexes, my intentions can be easily misconstrued as abuse. In any event, while the effects may seem similar my intentions are quite the opposite. My use of the nude comes partly from my love of the tradition of figure drawings, and an attempt at universality. I use figures in my art for the specific reason of studying the human condition by creation. Making representations of human beings seems to me to be the best way to study people and the way they interact pictorially. This is really the basis of most of my art, although it is usually from the personal perspective. The origin of this book comes from my musings about what has happened to the female models that I have created visual representations of in my art. Some of my models are the impersonal hired type, and some are friends, and a small special few would qualify as the cherished “muse.” Far from mere objectivism (especially where the muse type are concerned) these representations were actually meant as my attempt to include another into my life and art. I am also struck by the fact that poets don’t seem to be viewed in the same disregard. Perhaps the cusp of this problem resides in the conflict between abstract desire and the definition of pornography (because let’s face it, nobody masturbates to love poetry.) This dichotomy is the conflict of the book (to think of it in literary terms.) And it is not a problem that I mean to solve, but only to meditate upon. Perhaps the pictures are too real and we mistrust our visceral reactions. These conflicts are something that I think of as hardwired into our minds and in order to escape them we would have to remake ourselves. A balance therefore must be established. In any event if I failed in my good intentions and I am guilty of objectivism, this book is meant as an atonement and an acknowledgement of the contribution of my models and muses. Here are the ladies represented in this book. (Although the last names have been removed to protect the innocent. <:G>) Art Tiffany; Inna; Julie; Nikki; Nancy; Sara; Sherry; Susan. Thanks @>”-;————“-;—————- PS. The form of the book is an abstraction of the traditional shell taken from the birth of Venus (the most famous rendition being that of Sandro Botticelli.) I was also thinking during the construction about the old folks story called “The pearl of great price.” – Media used: Ink jet prints of photographs and drawings with computer generated imagery, string, lace, shell, and hand painting. (Placed in a shaped portfolio box.)]
Lent by the artist
The abandoned muse.
#49
Binder, Andrew [Artist and paper engineer]
Chicken Little meets the rules of slack.
[Ft. Lauderdale, FL: The artist, ©2001]
[18] p. + colophon + mounted wishbone: [8 col. pop-ups]; 20 x 14.5 x 4.5 cm.
[In box; signed by the artist on inside top lid of box; book wrapped in gauze-like paper. – “I don’t think that y’all need much of a talking to about this book (except to acknowledge some of the intellectual debts that I owe) and to say that it is a tale of lost love. . . . The book itself was created entirely with old time print technology and hand gilding w/ some other stuff. The text is solvent transfer. The images are either hand carved, rubber stamps or etchings. I have no real reason for doing this; except that I thought that it would be neat (How many etching pop up books have you seen lately?) and it was a technical problem that I set for myself. To be completely contrary (because I can) the images/text on the box were digitally output. Varnished and reworked. Burnt spaghetti and a rotisserie chicken provided the textures/images and inspiration.” – Colophon]
Lent by the artist

Chicken Little meets the rules of slack.

Chicken Little meets the rules of slack.

#50
Binder, Andrew [Artist and paper engineer]
Juxtaposition.
[by] Andrew Binder.
[Ft. Lauderdale, FL: The artist, ©2001]
[12] p.: [6] double-page col. pop-ups + box; 58 x 34 x 5 cm [book closed]; 65 x 42 x 47 [book open] 65 x 42 x 11 cm [box]
[Cover title. – “Simulation, simulacra, sign, symbol, signified. Have just to many s’s. Someone needs to teach the critics and art philosophers how to dance. (or to have some language elegance.) And then maybe they will learn some grace for expressing their thoughts. Heck, they certainly demand this of the artists. A swaying rhythm too their language would be better. But for changing times and changing technologies.” – p. [3] of cover]
Lent by the artist
2002
Juxtaposition.
#51
Binder, Andrew [Artist and paper engineer]
[Hopes of whispered germination].
[Ft. Lauderdale, FL: The artist, ©2002]
[20] p. : [1 col. pop-up] + box with 11 compartments; 57 x 42 x 9.5 cm.
[In box with 11 compartments containing dried vegetables, food, and seeds; and small objects, textiles, leaves from books, drawings, etc.]
Lent by the artist

Hopes of whispered germination.

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