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  Before The Event     During The Event     After The Event     Resources  

Before the Event

Pool damage can lead to expensive repair bills after a weather event, such as a hurricane, if proper precautions are not taken. The pool pump and other electrical components are most vulnerable to damage.

  • Turn off the power to the pool equipment to stop any power surges. 
  • Remove the pool pump motor and store it indoors in a dry place to prevent damage due to flooding. Or, wrap the motor in a plastic material (such as a garment bag) and secure it tightly with tape or rope.
  • Do not drain your pool. Water in the pool will act as a shield for the finish of the pool, protecting it from the damaging effects of sand and flying debris. You may lower the water level slightly, but no more than one or two feet. Otherwise, the hydrostatic pressure may cause the pool to pop out of the ground.
  • Add extra chlorine to the water to prevent contamination. If the water pressure fails after a storm, a pool can provide a ready source of water for flushing toilets or washing hands. Don't let anyone enter the pool after it has been chlorinated.
  • Placing a cover over your pool to keep debris out may result in damage to the cover, which can be costly to replace. It is generally easier and less costly to clean out your pool than replace a cover.
  • Wrap any exposed pool filters with plastic and secure.
  • Remove all loose items from the pool area (furniture, pool cleaning equipment, filter house tops, deck lids, etc.) and store them inside. Do not put these items in the bottom of your pool. They can move around during the storm and damage the surface of your pool.
  • Remove the child safety fence from around the pool. 
  • Remove all canvas patio awnings and bring them indoors.
  • If your pool area is screened, you may prevent costly damage to the frame structure by removing one or two panels of screen above the chair rail on each side to allow the wind to blow through. Don’t remove the lower panels or panels overhead. Slip the pins out of the door hinges and place the doors in a protected area.

 

Updated May 2013


 

 


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